Healthy Beginnings

Nagalase and GcMAF: How these alternative options can treat cancer

A look at a macrophage cell at work. Photo: I-stock

Nagalase and GcMAF are big buzz words in the alternative cancer treatment field these days. To help simplify and educate, I’ve put together a quick explanation of how these two relate to cancer.

Cancer is a metabolic disease

To survive and keep producing energy, cancer cells must switch over to glycolysis alone as the source of their energy.

Cancer cells need 18 times more sugar than normal cells to grow and prosper at all times. They literally become the “bullies on the block” by depriving normal cells of adequate nutrition. It has also been proven that cancer cells have between 10 to 100 times the number of insulin receptors on their cell membranes as do normal cells.

These cells also enter into a state of hypoxia, which is a lack of oxygen. This combination creates an anaerobic environment of now-sickened cells that start a “fermentation” process. Remember, the more cancer cells there are, the higher the fermentation process is.

In an effort to survive detection from the immune system and thrive, cancer cells, in their evolution, have developed the production of a protective enzyme called alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminidase or Nagalase for short.

The Nagalase enzyme has the ability to completely shut down the activity of the localized immune macrophage cells, whose job it is to destroy any cell that has been harmed or is not functioning normally.

With the macrophage cells immobilized, the tumor is effectively “cloaked” from detection by the immune system. This is the reason that someone can have a strong functioning immune system and still be growing a tumor.

GcMAF therapy

“How,” you ask, “can someone get the Macrophage cells turned back on?”

Fortunately, there is a therapy called GcMAF. GcMAF was discovered and proven in Philadelphia in the late ‘90s.

The MAF in GcMAF stands for “Macrophage Activating Factor.” Gc stands for the type of protein molecule. GcMAF is created in the body by the release of two sugar molecules from a GcProtein molecule.

Nagalase degrades the GCProtein created by the body to the point it is unable to become GcMAF. Since GcMAF only lives for about a week in the body, without continuous conversion of GcProtein, the stores of GcMAF are depleted rapidly in the presence of the enzyme Nagalase. However, Nagalase can only destroy GcProtein and not GcMAF.

What does this mean?

It means that the body cannot make its own GcMAF. Thus, the introduction of external GcMAF through injection into the body has been shown to be effective. This keeps the Macrophage cell activity against the cancer cells optimal.

There is an additional caveat to keep in mind, however. If the body is deficient in Vitamin D, this therapy cannot work. To some, it is a surprise to discover their Vitamin D levels are so low.

We have an easy Vitamin D oral supplement available to help boost deficiency. At Reno Integrative Medical Center in Reno, we also offer both the Nagalase test as well as GcMAF therapy. The Nagalase blood test is a good way to check the progress of treatment.

Dr. Robert A. Eslinger, D.O., H.M.D., specializes in cancer and chronic disease and is an integrative cancer doctor licensed to practice in California, Idaho and Nevada. He is head doctor at the Reno Integrative Medical Center. Visit www.renointegrative.com or call 775-829-1009 to learn more.